Moonrise over Great Oyster Bay, Swansea Tasmania

This photo of Great Oyster Bay was taken at Swansea, Tasmania, the day before we ventured over to the Freycinet Peninsula (seen here across the bay) for a hike down to iconic Wineglass Bay. Tasmania is a huge source of inspiration for my fantasy fiction writing, with its beautiful, fierce wilderness and even fiercer convict history.

#faransilverton

Tasmania 2012.02.06 (106).JPG
Great Oyster Bay, Swansea Tasmania

 

 

Cascade at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, South Australia

img_0783
‘Cascade’ – sculpture by Sergio Redegalli

I took this photo of the ‘Cascade’ glass sculpture by Sergio Redegalli when I attended amazing bestselling fiction author Fiona McIntosh‘s Commercial Fiction Masterclass at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens in South Australia. Apparently this piece weighs 12 tonnes!

I only realised just now that the reflection of the Palm House on the left hand side looks like part of the wave. And yes, that is a duck photobombing on the other side of the water.

I’ve previously written about attending other writers’ weekends with Fiona – you can read more at An author’s journey – the business of writing (2015) and Business of writing – building your brand (2016).

 

Done and Darbie’d – story intro part 2

Following on from yesterday’s post Done and Darbie’d – story intro part 1, here’s the second part of the introduction to my short story, which was published last year in The Never Never Land fantasy fiction anthology.

Dead tree at sunset

He loathed it; the wilderness, the witless horse beneath him. His fear of these ominous, overgrown hills was boundless. Fear that ran its chill finger down his spine in the dead of night, the fear of being lost while a dead man’s boots trod in his wake, a ghost seeking retribution.

Illira’s escape – a writing exercise

2009-05-17 On top of the worldThis is a piece I wrote when I attended Fiona McIntosh’s writing Masterclass two years ago. It gave me a good dose of confidence, a sort of epiphany that I could actually write.

Illira blew out a breath as she trotted towards the escarpment, trying to ease the heaviness in her belly. The field parted like a curtain before her horse, into yet another never ending row of wheat. A glance over her shoulder confirmed her suspicion; the trampled crop left a stark betrayal of the path she’d taken.

She pressed the horse into a canter, reassuring the beast with a hand on its damp neck. The gelding’s breath rasped over the whisper of passing wheatsheafs. Just a little further now to the cliff track, where their trail of hoofprints would disappear into the shale.

As the field ebbed away, a eucalyptus tang stung Illira’s nose, drifting from the forest spilt over the clifftop above her. The horse’s hooves crunched onto the stone path, a mere goat track, really, but at least it led to safety.

She bit her lip, having to let the horse slow to pick its way along, knowing at every step they were as exposed as a blowfly on a fresh shorn sheep.

 

What inspires you? Part 1 – a post on Providence, by an amazing friend

This has been ‘one of those weeks’, lots going on in life with a pretty depressing bombardment of bad news from the media on top. I even noticed the news page I follow started a ‘good news’ section, but I can’t quite decide if this is a good thing or not: one very small chunk of good news, which has been the same all week, while a whirlwind of atrocities continues around the world.

So when I saw my friend Jenny’s post this morning, I was so glad to read about kind people doing good things. My bad news fatigue lifted immediately. To read Jenny’s inspiring story, please click the link below.

I’ve been going to a brain injury support group since I realised I had a brain injury back in 2009. The group is basically just a bunch of friends who get together to chat over coffee. Not everyone who goes along has had something go awry with their brains. Some are carers, some have lost people to stroke, […]

via Providence — gbmsurvivor